Almost one in four were aged between ten and 17 sparking fears of a new generation of young violent "ladettes".

Since digital abuse does not leave physical marks on their children, parents may be clueless about the abuse.

Kids are also afraid to report the abuse to their parents because they may believe the abuse is not that big a deal, or they fear losing cell phone and laptop privileges, experts say.

About 10 percent of teens interviewed say a romantic partner stopped them from using a computer or cell phone.

The study examined 4,400 responses from 11- to 18-year-old students in one school district in the southern U. The study's authors say this is one of the first attempts to quantify how often digital dating abuse is occurring among teens.

"She is required to keep her cell phone on all day, all night and be receptive," Murray explains.

The abuse online and through cell phones can sometimes turn into physical violence, she warned.

"It may be checking her text and pictures to make sure she's not texting with any other boys," explains Sameer Hinduja, co-founder of the Cyberbullying Research Center and associate professor of criminology at Florida Atlantic University.

"He wants to make sure the pictures are appropriate.

Kevin Jennings, assistant deputy secretary of education for the Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools, says digital dating abuse is becoming a more frequent problem among teens.

The 24/7 technology enables the abusive partner to stalk the other person after school and on weekends, he said.

"It's the phenomenon of no place to run and no place to hide," Jennings says. You can't even see your predator coming." Jill Murray, a psychotherapist in California who has worked with victims of teen dating abuse, says almost all her new cases in the past three years involve technology.